Capitol coup prompts banks and businesses to dump Trump and GOP

Capitol coup prompts banks and businesses to dump Trump and GOP

  • 01/13/2021 9:22 am ET Sabrina Matthews
Businesses and banks dump Trump and sycophant senators after the Capitol mob scene

Deutsche Bank, Wikimedia Commons

Since the day he gave the Capitol mob their marching orders, Trump’s own capital may have been laid waste as well.

Businesses, banks, and digital bully pulpits are dropping Trump like he’s coated in the feces his thugs left on the Capitol walls. So if you’re looking for the value of the Trump Brand, try looking in the toilet.

After sending the insurrectionists off to lay siege to the hallowed halls of American democracy, the president retreated back to his posh West Wing man-cave to revel in live images of his minions storming through Capitol halls and into lawmakers’ chambers. But when the wave of thugs receded, they seem to have taken Donald Trump’s fortunes with them. And some of these companies don’t want anything to do with his congressional sycophants either.

Here are some of the former business bedfellows who are running from the stink.

Deutsche Bank is all out

Donald Trump's loans from Deutsche Bank were backed by Russia

Source: Flickr / Bjorn Laczay

Formerly known as “The Only Bank Left That Would Lend Donald Trump Money,” Deutsche Bank is ready to lose that honor after their most orange creditor sent the Capitol mob off to storm the castle. The bank has reportedly been looking for the exit since Trump was elected, and the president’s incitement of insurrection was a smooth off-ramp.

Deutsche announced that it would no longer work with Trump (or his businesses) in the future, but they still hold the notes on his Miami golf course and hotels in Chicago and Washington DC. It will be tricky for Donald to pay those off since he’s used to paying back his loans to Deutsche by taking out other loans … from Deutsche Bank.

Signature Bank says take your friends with you

Signature Bank is one of the businesses dumping Trump after the Capitol mob rioted.

screenshot / signatureny.com

What they saw from the Capitol mob was more than enough to cause Signature Bank to close Big Don’s accounts, which the New York Times reports are worth a measly $5.3 mil. (Sure it sounds like a lot, but it’s pennies on his over $420 million dollar debt.)

Signature is calling Trump out too. “The resignation of the president,” their company website reads, “is in the best interests of our nation and the American people.”

The bank is even cutting off Trump’s enablers in Congress. The bank “will not do business in the future with any members of Congress who voted to disregard the Electoral College,” according to Susan Turkell, a spokeswoman for the bank.

Try to get in the check out line behind them for when the clerk says, “Will that be cash or…uh, cash?” Hey, Dolly Parton has a song for that!

That’s quite a handicap

A photograph of Donald Trump playing golf.

Screenshot/YouTube

If there is one thing we can all agree Trump dedicated himself to during his one term in office, it was golf.

Even so, he’ll never play in the pros, and now he’ll never host them either. After witnessing the Capitol mob, the PGA will not be holding any more events at Donald’s courses. The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews (R&A) also announced that if they were ever going to hold an event at a Trump golf course, they won’t be now.

Hotel motel what’cha gonna do today

A tiny bar of soap reads "c'est la cata," or , in English, "it's a disaster."

Sigmund / Unsplash

Apparently, the Trump business was preparing to open a string of hotels the New York Times refers to as “budget-friendly.” Some country cousins from the Capitol mob will be heartbroken, as their dreams of bringing home tiny soap cakes with big T’s carved in them may never come true.

As for the hotels that already exist, some in New York, Panama, and Toronto no longer wish to license the Trump name. And unloading the ones Trump actually owns for fast cash is going to be tough. The president’s real estate broker just dropped him.

Anti-social

A photograph of a cell phone screen loaded with social media apps.

Pixabay

It’s hard to imagine what Trump will do in his off hours now that Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and Pinterest have all put his accounts on ice.

Snapchat had already dialed his volume down during Black Lives Matter protests, removing him from their Discover feature, saying, “We will not amplify voices who incite racial violence and injustice by giving them free promotion on Discover.”

Now, bans that were at first temporary on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram have become permanent on Twitter, and “indefinite” on Facebook and Instagram. “We believe the risk of allowing the President to continue to use our service during this period are simply too great,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg stated while announcing Trump will be banned from his companies’ platforms at least until Joe Biden is inaugurated.

Shopify no longer hosts Trump’s official stores but he still has accounts on TikTok and YouTube — for now anyway. How long can you last anywhere once you’ve been banned from Pinterest?

Rudy Giuliani has a fool for a client

Giuliani may be surprised at his own fallout from the Capitol mob scene.

Screenshot / ABC

The New York State Bar Association is investigating President Trump’s (latest) personal lawyer, Rudolph Giuliani, who suggested “trial by combat” to the capitol mob during his comments at the rally.

Let us all hope that Rudy represents himself at his disbarment hearing. And Trump could maybe drum up a little cash running a side bet on what color will be streaming down his attorney’s sweaty mug.

Pardon me?

Trump with dark orange makeup on that isn't blended correctly

The White House

Both White House Counsel Pat Cipollone and William Barr (who got himself fi-resigned before the Capitol mob even rolled up in DC) have advised the president against trying to pardon himself. Barr and Cipollone both believe there is a Justice Department memo that denies the president the right to self-pardon.

Apparently, they had no time to make sure, with the never-ending barrage of legal troubles during the Trump administration. Donald might want to take their word for it, though; it would be a crapshoot to argue a self-pardon in court, even if Mitch McConnell did help you hire most of the judges.

Trump may feel safer with that play, though, than what most advise, which is to resign and let Vice President Pence do the dirty work. That will be a tricky ask for the president, having sent his thugs to “Hang Mike Pence,” or at least to chant it while Pence was hunkered away from the Capitol mob. Oklahoma Senator Jim Inhofe quoted Pence talking about the president; “After all the things I’ve done for him,” which is rarely a phrase that introduces an act of goodwill.

Either way, Trump is in for legal trouble. No federal pardon can protect him from state charges, like from the Southern District of New York, where the president bears the classy moniker of ‘unindicted co-conspirator.’ Plus his incitement to the Capitol mob has opened him up to a wealth of civil action that could drag on for years and strip Trump of what little he has left.

Oh, no you didn’t

A photograph of graduates throwing their mortarboard caps in the air.

Canva

Some universities that have granted Trump honorary degrees have taken them away again. Schools that stuck by him after Trump was rumored to have paid someone else to take his SATs, just couldn’t abide by his inciting the Capitol mob.

But, hey, “Wharton School of Business.” Yup, that’s a thing.

Bye bye love

A split screen as Trump insurrectionists mob Capitol as US Representatives and staff shelter on the floor of the chamber.

screenshot / MSNBC

The 147 Republican members of Congress who registered their objections to certifying the election results even after the Capitol mob had swarmed their chambers can kiss a big chunk of their campaign dollars goodbye. AT&T, the largest single-company contributor in the 2019-2020 cycle, has cut these Trump enablers off.

Marriott International, Airbnb, and Morgan Stanley followed suit. So did the Dow, who the New York Times reports has suspended contributions for two or six years depending on election cycles, “to any member of Congress who voted to object to the certification of the presidential election.”

Hallmark took it a step further, asking Senators Josh Hawley of Missouri and Roger Marshall of Kansas to give their campaign contributions back after they voted against certifying the election. “Hallmark believes the peaceful transition of power is part of the bedrock of our democratic system,” the company said in a statement, “and we abhor violence of any kind.” Duh, you guys. I mean, haven’t you seen any of their movies?

Last refuge of a scoundrel

DOnald Trump may need a disguise to escape his part in the Capitol mob.

Screenshot / YouTube

Alaska’s Lisa Murkowski wants Trump out and may leave the Republican party altogether if the rest of the GOP can’t quit him.

Meanwhile, Trump will have to stick close to the members of the Capitol mob, after he loses his hotels to the bank. Or else he’ll have to head somewhere they still like him, like Brazil, Israel, or Saudi Arabia. Unless he starts calling them sh*thole countries.

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